What Causes Your AC to Freeze Up?

Why Did My Air Conditioner Freeze Up?

Your air conditioner has a very important role in the health of your home. If it gets too cold, however, the unit can easily freeze up.  If your air conditioner is freezing up, it’s important to take immediate action to prevent further damage. There are a few reasons why your air conditioner may be freezing up: One possibility is that the air conditioner is low on refrigerant. When this happens, the air conditioner is not able to cool the air properly, and the coils can freeze. Another possibility is that the air conditioner is not getting enough air flow. This can be caused by a dirty air filter or a blockage in the air conditioner’s ductwork. If the air conditioner is not getting enough air flow, the coils can also freeze. To prevent your air conditioner from freezing up, it’s important to keep the coils clean and free of dirt and debris. You should also make sure that the air conditioner’s ductwork is clear and free of any blockages. If you think that your air conditioner is low on refrigerant, it’s important to have it checked by a professional. Only a trained technician should add refrigerant to an air conditioner. If your air conditioner does freeze up, turn it off immediately and contact a licensed professional.

How Your Air Conditioner Works

Your AC unit is filled with freon, a gas that runs along small copper tubes throughout the unit. When this freon expands, its temperature drops. An AC unit is, in essence, a fan blowing air over the cold freon-filled tubes. If you live in a hot climate, it is important to have a working air conditioner. Unfortunately, air conditioners can sometimes freeze up. This can be a major problem, as a frozen air conditioner will not be able to properly cool your home. There are a few different things that can cause an air conditioner to freeze up.

  • One of the most common causes of a frozen air conditioner is a dirty air filter. The air filter is responsible for trapping dirt, dust, and other airborne particles. Over time, the air filter can become clogged with these particles. When this happens, the air filter will not be able to effectively do its job. As a result, the air conditioner will have to work harder to cool the air. This extra work can cause the air conditioner to freeze up.
  • Another common cause of a frozen air conditioner is a leaking duct. If there is a leak in the ductwork, cool air can escape. This can cause the air conditioner to work harder to cool the air, which can eventually lead to the unit freezing up.
  • Finally, a frozen air conditioner can also be caused by a faulty thermostat. If the thermostat is not working properly, it may not be able to accurately measure the temperature of the air. As a result, the air conditioner may run for too long or turn on and off too frequently, which can also cause the air conditioner to freeze.

What To Do With A Frozen AC

If your AC freezes up, don’t panic! First, lay towels underneath the unit to catch any water. Turn it off and wait for the ice to melt. Check to see if any of the reasons stated above are to blame. Complete this small checklist before proceeding:

  1. Is my AC filter clean and is air able to pass over the coils?
  2. Does my fan turn on when the AC is turned on?
  3. Is it just too cold outside?
  4. When did I service my AC last?

Final Thoughts

While these are some common scenarios, there are plenty of other reasons that your AC might freeze up. If you are unsure, contact your local HVAC & home improvement professional. Call Checklist Inspections for a no-obligation estimate today.

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